Tag Archives: AICPA

Hiring Accounting, Auditing Help For the Busy Season

For accountants, the New Year means the start of the “busy season”. The busy season means opportunities for temporary contractors hired to fill holes and support corporate accounting teams, and with little time to fill those roles the responsibility mainly falls to temporary employment agencies.

BusySeasonThe big question is whether they really have your best interest at hand. Unlike VouchedIn where you can view, select and hire candidates directly, you lack that opportunity with temporary staffing agencies. Often times, adding a third party into the mix can lead to miscommunication about the available position, skills sets and timeline.

If you’re a company who regularly adds temporary accounting contractors to your staff, you might want to take heed to these tips to ensure you find the right candidates, reduce turnover, stay on hiring budget and ensure you meet deadlines – the three things that increase costs during accounting season.

1. Do you rely solely on the staffing agency’s referrals?  It’s important that you know who you are hiring and feel comfortable with them. You need more than a body to fill a post, you need a skilled professional who can do the job.

2. References are one of the best ways to know whether you are hiring the right professional with the right ethics, and more importantly is the right fit for your team. Before just hiring someone based on a staffing agency’s selection, make the time to find out more and you will save your company, and department, time and money.

3. Double check their background. It never hurts to take a few moments to review a candidate’s resume to make sure they can do the job.

4. Ensure they meet skill demands and time commitment. Your staffing agency should ensure that your candidate meets all of your needs, but it never hurts to ask the candidate yourself to confirm they are truly aware of the position’s demands. Many times contractors will apply for a job and be recommended to you without actually having all the skills and availability required.

5. Fee equals higher quality and motivation. The primary reason many contractors go through staffing agencies because they have no choice. Their reluctance comes from the fact that staffing agencies take a majority of the fee you’re willing to pay a contractor for their own coffers. In turn, you get fewer qualified, experienced candidates willing to take lower pay for a project, leading to problems down the line for your team. Better pay not only leads to higher quality candidates but happier candidates who do better work.

6. Make them feel part of the team. It may seem as if you have no time to on board your temporary staff members, but it can be one of the most important things that you do, aside of everything above. Even though they are not full-time employees, it is just as important to make them feel welcome and part of your team and company culture. After all, they are just as interested in you hiring them again in the future as you are interested in having the ease of knowing you already have solid and tested people you can count on.

Overall, the better experience your contractors have with your company and department can turn them into brand ambassadors. The alternative is one that many companies fail to consider as an important part of company reputation as fodder at a weekend BBQ.

In turn, relinquishing all control to a staffing agency is not in your best interest and can cause more stress than necessary during an already stressful time. it only takes a a short amount of time to take the power back to verify and certify you are getting the right talent.

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Northern Cousins Share U.S. Future in Temporary Work

joboppA pronounced shift toward temporary gigs and unstable positions could become the new normal for this generation as demand for short-term workers rises across the country, according to one of the country’s biggest employment firms.

The latest job figures show the economy unexpectedly shed some 9,400 jobs in June. That leaves the country with some 72,000 jobs created in the past year, an increase of just 0.4 per cent, the lowest year-over-year growth rate since February 2010, when employment growth just started to pick up after the 2008-2009 recession,Statistics Canada said Friday.

Full-time jobs rose 0.2 per cent since last June, while part-time gigs are up one per cent, an indication that employers are preferring less commitment in their hires.

Such a slow growing market, a reflection of insecurity about the global economy, is ripe for an increase in temporary jobs. Demand for temporary workers grew by 15 per cent in the second quarter of the year, compared to the same quarter of 2013, research from Randstad Canada suggests.

Read more on The Huffington Post

Temp Work Preference Also Growing Across the Pond

Four in ten (41%) British workers plan to work on a temporary basis at some point in their careers, a new study by YouGov and the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) has found.

flexibleworkingThe report Flex Appeal, which polled 4,234 British adults, also found that 36% of people had already worked in a temporary role at some point in their career.

The most common forms of temporary work were for agencies (performed by 24% of those surveyed), freelancing (11%) or contracting (10%).

REC chief executive Kevin Green said flexible working is particularly appealing to young people, parents and workers approaching retirement.

He warned that temporary workers should not be looked down upon as second-rate.

“If you talk to people who work this way, they value being able to fit work around their family commitments, can earn more, or are using temporary assignments to pick up specific skills and experience they couldn’t get elsewhere,” Green said.

– See more at: http://www.hrmagazine.co.uk/hro/news/1145429/-british-workers-plan-temping#sthash.xC5tVHvz.dpuf

Wonder Why It’s Hard to Find Good Talent? Look at Your Staffing Agency

frustratedThere’s a reason I don’t work with staffing agencies….they are only after profits.  It’s so frustrating!  A recent encounter goes something like this:

I received an email via LinkedIn to see if I had time to talk with a friend of a connection about a project and I said I could make time the following day at 10a.m or 1p.m. as I was at my son’s baseball practice. A few minutes later the staffing guy calls me, after 6 pm, when I clearly told him the next day would be best.

 During the conversation, I stopped the staffing guy shortly into the conversation to say that I wouldn’t consider the project for less than $XXX per hour. He said that wouldn’t be a problem and continued on his sales pitch for the project. It was a typical Sarbanes-Oxley (SOx) testing engagement, where an employee moved into another role and the employer now needed someone to step in and do the internal controls testing for a few months.

The staffing guy then proceeded to ask me questions that were part of the project description from the employer, but of which he had little understanding. He started listing some business processes off – revenue, cash, inventory – and I stopped him. He clearly had no clue about my background or the real requirements of the project. I said that I have run projects from beginning to end since the first days of SOx and continue to lead several of these projects.

He asked me if we could meet the following day (typical staffing industry screening process) to see if I looked the part, and, undoubtedly, to coach me on what I need to be prepared to say to the employer to get the project. I said that I couldn’t meet until the following week and he requested my resume, even though he found me on Linkedin, so that he could start his process.

The next morning he called and left a message, and also an email introducing me to his business partner that would also be screening me. ENOUGH ALREADY! Leave me alone! I emailed him to say I was not interested in the project and thanked him for his time. What a mess!

I felt like I needed a shower just from talking with the guy. I decided overnight, and he confirmed that, again, I wouldn’t work with a staffing firm again.

The best part is, if they decide you’re not a fit for the project, they go completely cold on you – won’t respond to calls or emails. In, fact it’s been a few weeks and I still have not heard from the staffing guy – no courtesy call or email, no thank you, no networking, nothing. But, it is what I expect.

It’s not much better if the contractor gets the project either. The staffing firm expects a certain number of billable hours. I’ve actually been nagged about getting my 40 hours in because “we have budgets to meet”.

It’s all about meeting the staffing firm revenue goals. It’s not about the contractor,
the hiring client or the candidate you are paying them to find.

You wonder why it’s hard to find good talent? Because those trying to find it for you are;

  • Unprofessional
  • Have little knowledge of the industry they are hiring for
  • Lack the knowledge to effectively find the right candidate
  • Completely disrespect contractors along the way, because they “own” the opportunities
  • The contractor isn’t paid fairly because the staffing firm is taking 50-70% of what the employer is paying
  • Staffing firms are putting their revenue goals before the things that really matter such as the contractor’s efficiency, performance or existence as a human, and their client’s (employer’s) needs as well

It’s time for a change. Try VouchedIn it’s completely free and you will get better, happier talent, reduce turnover and see high-quality performance on your project.